Researcher Archives: Wessel Bruinsma

GP-ALPS: Automatic Latent Process Selection for Multi-Output Gaussian Process Models

A simple and widely adopted approach to extend Gaussian processes (GPs) to multiple outputs is to model each output as a linear combination of a collection of shared, unobserved latent GPs. An issue with this approach is choosing the number of latent processes and their kernels. These choices are typically done manually, which can be […]

The Gaussian Process Autoregressive Regression Model (GPAR)

Multi-output regression models must exploit dependencies between outputs to maximise predictive performance. The application of Gaussian processes (GPs) to this setting typically yields models that are computationally demanding and have limited representational power. We present the Gaussian Process Autoregressive Regression (GPAR) model, a scalable multi-output GP model that is able to capture nonlinear, possibly inputvarying, dependencies between outputs in a simple and tractable way: the product rule is used to decompose the joint distribution over the outputs into a set of conditionals, each of which is modelled by a standard GP. GPAR’s efficacy is demonstrated on a variety of synthetic and real-world problems, outperforming existing GP models and achieving state-of-the-art performance on the tasks with existing benchmarks.

Learning Causally-Generated Stationary Time Series

We present the Causal Gaussian Process Convolution Model (CGPCM), a doubly nonparametric model for causal, spectrally complex dynamical phenomena. The CGPCM is a generative model in which white noise is passed through a causal, nonparametric-window moving-average filter, a construction that we show to be equivalent to a Gaussian process with a nonparametric kernel that is biased towards causally-generated signals. We develop enhanced variational inference and learning schemes for the CGPCM and its previous acausal variant, the GPCM (Tobar et al., 2015b), that significantly improve statistical accuracy. These modelling and inferential contributions are demonstrated on a range of synthetic and real-world signals.